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“The range of contrasts within in each work tends to be very narrow, and the surface action is kept at a subtle level with a restrained application. The possible pop of color is kept trapped within a confining cage of shapes. While Joseph Albers set square within square in order to pay homage to all the possible permutation of color relationships, Kerwin is less pedagogical and more playful. As a result her “squares” are not sequential but interlocking and interfacing, nestling sharply one against another—fat and thin, pushing for dominance.”

—Jeanne Willette, Art Historians of Southern California, “BEAUTIFUL ART BEAUTIFUL ARTIST,” July 6, 2012
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“The meticulous use of wax or acrylic produces a calm oasis for viewers within the rigidity of rectangles. Her process is lengthy and sometimes strenuous, yet there seems to be no turmoil in the works. ...Her new geometrics using metallics vibrate with the scent of the elusive, ephemeral moment, like a thought caught midway. We wonder what is next in the turn of the rectangle; will it shift forward or back?”

—Constance Moffatt, “BARBARA KERWIN: GEOMETRIC PROGRESSIONS,” 2012
Full Review